The Street With No Name

street with no name
Part of the street with no name

I lived in the inner Sydney suburb of Glebe for over six years. It’s a wonderful part of the world with plenty of things to do, which I’ve written about here. However on a return trip to this leafy, colourful suburb just last weekend, I discovered a side to the place I never knew existed. The locals call it “the street with no name.”

Quiet

The light rail viaduct across the way from Jubilee Park is the scene and the street with no name runs behind this. It was, not so long ago, accessible via a forested path that winds around the side. However now this nameless ‘street’ is completely fenced off. Situated a mere four kilometres or so from Sydney’s CBD, it’s also an unusually quiet spot.

street with no name

Dark

Local legend and several paranormal websites allege that six deaths occurred in and around the site (one ostensibly a satanic murder). Upon investigation, however, I can confirm that three deaths occurred at the street with no name and all were young boys. Thus the street with no name, which English ‘non-fiction’ writer and theatre reviewer Allison Vale describes as “a desolate place, dark and deeply foreboding”, is alleged to be haunted.

The shadows upon this nameless street descended in 1968, when the mutilated body of a three-year-old boy was found concealed along its edge. The murder remains unsolved. Eight years later, the body of a 12-year-old boy was found nearby with severe head injuries. Only seven months after that, in almost exactly the same spot, the body of another 12-year-old boy was found with multiple stab wounds.

Unsurprisingly, the place became a no-go zone for children.

street with no name
The viaduct alongside the street with no name

The street with no name is almost impossible to access now. However, while I lived in Glebe, it wasn’t and I strolled through the laneway behind the site many times. I never felt anything unusual, although many have reported they have.

Haunted

Sydney ghostbusters West Sydney Paranormal Research recently conducted an investigation of the entire site. As they couldn’t get through the fence, they found nothing particularly unusual, except in the nearby grandstands where it was alleged homeless man Reg Malvin was bludgeoned to death during the night in 2000. You can listen to the recording they captured at this locale here.

The arched recesses beneath the light rail viaduct are used for storage, photo shoots and even as music venues. Mark Brynes, who has rented one of these – which he dubs “the tomb” – for almost ten years, says one night he heard “ghostly footsteps” outside the window, in the exact spot where the body of the first murdered 12-year-old boy was found. Brynes quickly left, after which he said, “something didn’t seem right. My heart was racing.”

street with no name
One of the recesses used for storage inside the viaduct

Journalist Allison Vale curiously states that the area immediately around the site is populated with its own unique colony of bats. Even so, if you weren’t looking, you would almost certainly miss the street with no name, a place – despite my years of wandering past it – I had never heard of until now.

Today, this forbidden place is barely spoken of. A nameless, unseen part of Sydney that lies in shadow.

5 thoughts on “The Street With No Name”

  1. I’m not sure if this is the same road.

    About 1959 you could drive along an very narrow unmarked bitumen road from the end of Glebe Point Road at Rozelle Bay going between Johnstons Creek and Jubilee Oval and under the viaduct. Finally joining up with a road that could take you to the other side of the canal. Today you would call it a rat run.
    On Google Maps the Glebe Point Road end. looks like it is now a walkway.

  2. Pingback: The Street With No Name | Buscharter

  3. I used to go to the high school right near it and often walked through there as it was my way to walk home. As I knew about these murders including Reg who used to be a friendly homeless man who often watched us all at sports training it was a very eerie place. I’m 27 now however when my Aunty also attended the same high school and walked through there in the 70’s she was attacked in that street by a man however managed to escape and run home. I’m still a local and am not comfortable walking near there by myself.

    1. Thanks for the addition Ash. Even though I’ve never felt anything unusual there, it’s interesting to hear that many like yourself think otherwise. .

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